Your Foolproof Guide to Choosing the Right Marble Countertop

Consider This Your Foolproof Guide to Choosing the Right Marble Countertop

Your Foolproof Guide to Choosing the Right Marble Countertop

Marble surfaces are everywhere lately and it's not hard to see why. This choice is a classic that never seems to go style and it makes any room look expensive, instantly. But any big decision, you should weigh the pros and the cons before you run the plastic.

When it comes to picking a stone to finish off any space you want to know what you’re investing in and whether it’s a true fit for your lifestyle.

You also want to get cozy with the idea of the many different types (and price ranges) marble comes in. Well, consider this your official (and foolproof) guide to choosing the right marble countertop for you.

Read on and soon you’ll be well-versed and ready to pull the trigger.

Not All Marble Is Made Equal

Is it just us or is marble the ultimate “adult” addition to your home? Not just because it adds a polished sophisticated feel, but because you will never set another glass down without a coaster again, slice a lemon without a cutting board, and you better hope no one gets clumsy with the red wine.

The first question you need to ask when looking for the right marble surface for you is how porous the stone is. Different marbles have different attributes and choosing one that’s less porous can save you a lot of money, and anxieties, in the long run.

Opting for a marble such as Carrara, which is less porous, could have the longevity you’re seeking.

Beauty Is in the Imperfections

Marble is a material made by Mother Earth herself (minerals fused by heat over time, building into the strong rock face we know and love). Naturally, it comes with its own quirks and characteristics and no two slabs will ever look the same.

Calacatta tends to be more white (and pricier) while Carrara can contain more grays and blues in its veining.

When it comes to the veins—one of marbles most charming traits—having a professional who knows how to cut and place each slab, then work those quirks to your advantage may be as close as you will get to perfection.

Know Your Cuts

So how do you cut to ensure you get the look you want? There are two types of cuts: Crosscut and vein cut.

The former allows for the veins to be displayed more at random in an open-flower- pattern while the latter has a linear appearance.

When it comes time to lay your stone, make sure you communicate thoroughly with your contractor about how you want the seams (where two pieces of the stone meet) and veins to match up.

Caring for Your MarbleOnce you’ve done your research, picked your marble, confirmed a cut, you should get familiar with what the upkeep might look .

Acidic or oily substances citrus, vinegar or cleaning products can leave markings on your marble called etching. This can dull the surface of your countertops and can be difficult to get out without professional assistance.

To avoid this you will want to use a sealant from the get-go and should be aware that over the years you may have to reapply to keep up its attractiveness.

Marble is actually a softer material than some other stones and can easily show scratches and chipping with wear and tear.

Re: is it a lifestyle fit? Maybe look at how your family will be interacting with the places you’ve chosen marble for—whether its a high-traffic zone is something to consider.

Further, marble may be heat resistant but if met with a scorching hot pan it can definitely take on a few scars.

Pick Your Finish

Okay, so maybe your marble countertops coincide with one of the busiest rooms in your abode — not all hope is lost. The finish you choose can play a big part in the upkeep.

While a polished finish may be more ly to show wear and etching, a duller finish will take the years a lot more gracefully.

Same can be said for the way the corners are finished: narrow-cut corners may be more ly to chip than a rounded-off one.

You Don't Have to Go International 
to Find Good MarbleWhile Italy, Greece, and Spain have long been a go-to source for high-end marble, getting a little more local can still generate quality at a friendlier price. Quarries in Vermont and Colorado are not to be overlooked.

WHAT MARBLE IS RIGHT FOR YOU?

Now you’re basically a pro when it comes to these timeless surfaces. But don’t head to the store just yet, we want to get you familiarized with a few of the most common types of marble you might come face to face with so you know when you’ve found your perfect match.

Carrara

Hailing from Carrara, Italy, this is possibly the most popular pick when it comes to putting the finishing touches on your home. Not only because it’s cost effective and will stand the test of time (and dinner parties) but due to its beautiful attributes. A stark white stone with blue and grey veins that can really hold its own amongst an all-white kitchen.

Calacatta

Also quarried in Carrara, Italy, Calacatta is known for being on the pricier end. It brings a distinct look—most commonly white with thick dark veining but can also be found in Calacatta Gold (a golden yellow undertone to the vein) and Calacatta Michelangelo (which can be identified with its abundance of natural grey details).

Statuary

This marble contains a lot of similarities to Carrara in color, however, it's often identified by its natural glossy appearance. An elegant choice.

Levadia Black Marble

Also known as Titanium Black Marble, this Greek stone is a contrast to the many milky options we see so frequently. Its smoky white veins make it a stand-out choice.

Nero Marquina

Also an eye-catching black marble, Marquina is often sought out for being one of the world's most luxurious stones and is infamous for its striking pure white details.

Emperador Marble

Emperador can be found in Spain and is desirable for its unique rich brown coloring. If you are looking to make a statement yet remain in the realms of earth tones, it could be the marble for you.

Crema Marfil

Crema referring to it’s creamy-hue (sometimes even leaning towards a blush tone), this is another memorable option for those who don’t want to go crisp white with their surfaces. It is also a great fit if you’re wary about the surface showing wear—the tan undertones tend to mask subtle staining better than others.

YuleYule marble can only be extracted from Yule Creek, Colorado and has all the charm of a classic white stone. Being that it is more local, the cost of installation can come down significantly.

Danby

Danby marble is another option local to the USA—Vermont to be exact. With its low absorption and multitude of details, it’s a top choice for those seeking that effortless, elevated finish to a room.

Up Next: 11 Online Furniture Stores MyDomaine Editors Always Shop (and Their Top Picks)

Read More from MyDomaine

Source: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/consider-foolproof-guide-choosing-marble-192642246.html

Your Foolproof Guide to Choosing the Right Marble Countertop

Your Foolproof Guide to Choosing the Right Marble Countertop

Marble countertops are a classic choice when it comes to sprucing up the curb appeal of your kitchen and bathroom remodeling. The tons of options and features to consider will make your decision-making process challenging.

Good thing you are here, as this guide will take you to each factor that needs to be considered when you desire the best marble countertops in your remodeling.

What is Marble Stone Countertops

This metamorphic rock is made mostly of calcium and magnesium carbonate. These compounds are generally soft and highly reactive with acidic solutions. Despite its porous nature, all types of marble countertops have that glossy finish which increases the aesthetics and value of your home.

Different Types of Marble Countertops

There is much versatility in design when you go for marble stone for your kitchen and bathroom vanity tops. Below are the best marble countertops you can have in the industry.

1. Calacatta Marble Stone

This type is also mined in Carrara, Italy but with a higher cost compared to Carrara marble. It is characterized by a stark white background with bolder veinings for a dramatic appeal. Veinings can be in gold or gray tone.

2. Carrara Marble Stone

This is the most popular choice among homeowners due to its rich and spotless white background with gray and blue undertone veinings. It is more cost-efficient than Calacatta and can stand the test of time for its aesthetics and strength.

3. Statuary Marble Stone

When it comes to glossy and sleek appearance, this one is parallel with the popular Carrara marble stone. For your lucrative and modern theme, you can definitely count on this material.

4. Crema Marfil

It has a random veining pattern similar to granite but bolder giving its rich dramatic feel. Typically, this marble stone has a yellowish or beige background which elegantly contrasts with dark-colored cabinetry or island countertop.

5. Emperador Marble Stone

Among the types of marble stones, this one depicts a natural earth brown beauty. Generally, this type has a color variation fluctuating from brown to white to gray tones. Its veining patterns are usually in dark to a light gray tone. Overall, this is an excellent match up with rustic or tan brown cabinetry and furniture.

Polished or Matte Finish Marble

Manufactured marble countertops are naturally porous so it is prone to staining and bacterial growth. Choosing a polished finish would be best since the coat can cover its mineral pores. The only setback with this finish is the visibility of scratch marks.

Nevertheless, matte is still a viable option but for low-traffic areas in your home where there is less exposure to moisture and drinks. Moreover, this finish enables you to hide scratches in your countertop surface.

Marble Countertop Edge Styles

There are various styles for your marble countertop edge and it depends on your preference and purpose. The usual and common choice among homeowners will be the square edge. If you want to get rid of the sharp 90-degree edges, you can opt for an eased edge profile.

Meanwhile, a bevelled edge style will be good to easily wipe off spills from your marble countertops without dripping directly on the floor. The flat 45-degree surface of this edge profile reflects the light coming from your hanging pendant lamps. Overall, there is an increase in the brightness of your kitchen.

Maintenance of Marble Countertops

Acids, spills, knives, and abrasive pads are the best nemesis of your best marble countertops. For all our clients, we always apply impregnate sealants annually for their kitchen and marble bathroom countertops. This increases the anti-stain properties of marble.

When using knives and sharp objects, always use wooden boards to avoid scratches and destroying the sealant film of marble countertops. When doing your daily or weekly cleaning, only use neutral dish soap solution and sponge or soft towel.

Conclusion

Granite Expo is your one-stop-shop for all premier class of stone countertops such as granite, marble, quartz, Caesarstone, and quartzite. We offer all our custom marble countertops at an affordable price to suffice your need.

Our years of experience and modern technology will guarantee your satisfaction for the best marble countertops in the industry. If you need professional assistance for the fabrication and installation of your stone countertops, call us today

Call now to get your free quote or visit us on Yelp!

Source: https://graniteexpoonline.com/your-foolproof-guide-to-choosing-the-right-marble-countertop/

This Maryland Home, Perched Along the Potomac River, Looks a Woodsy Treehouse

Your Foolproof Guide to Choosing the Right Marble Countertop

Bringing the outdoors in is a hallmark of Alison Giese Interiors, so it comes as no surprise that this family home, perched in an equestrian community along the Potomac River, was a natural fit for her organic approach.

“The incredible location of this home was the major source of inspiration. It really felt a treehouse, where the outdoors was begging to be incorporated into the design.

The jumping-off point was the unique stone floors, which functioned to guide the design in a rustic, but modern way,” shares owner and lead creative Alison Giese.

Another driving factor in the design? The open floor plan. “You can set the stage of the home in the hub space of the kitchen and tie it into a softer space a family room,” she explains.

The striking mix of textures and calming colors throughout the great room was no mistake—Giese says she has a mental checklist of her favorite materials to call upon in any given project. “Jute? Check. Leather? Check. Something black (iron or ebonized wood?) Check.

I just love the way they work together, but depending on the profiles of the furnishings, they can read very differently. It's a way to be consistent with my process, without feeling stuck.”

Thanks to the Maryland home's distinctive features, the design plan came together effortlessly and remained consistent throughout the project.

“My team and I felt very confident in the initial direction of the design, so it was just a matter of finding the right finishes and materials to make that come alive!” Ahead, Giese and photographer Stacy Zarin Goldberg take us on a tour of the nature-inspired home and offer a glimpse into the design process.

Advertisement

Advertisement

While the design plan came easily, Giese faced her fair share of challenges along the way. Namely, providing enough practical storage and functionality to the homeowners while staying true to the organic design.

“The stone floors presented such a strong point-of-view, we couldn't help but be inspired by them, and really based all our decisions on, 'But does it work with the floors?'” Mission accomplished—the thoughtful mixture of white ceramic, warm woods, and sumptuous textures are the perfect complement to the earthy, gray stone.

Advertisement

While this riverside home has no shortage of jaw-dropping features, Giese notes the kitchen's custom built-in pantry as her favorite. “It's so functional (a coffee station lives in there), but with its quarter-sawn oak construction, it's ultimately a beautiful piece of furniture.”

Giese and her team took great care to transform a utilitarian space the kitchen into a room that was full of warmth. “I worked closely with our partner cabinet maker, Unique Kitchens & Baths, to get just the right material for the cabinets. We were thrilled when the finished space felt a natural extension of the outdoor elements,” Giese explains.

If there was ever a doubt that a sectional could be chic, this family-friendly sofa proves it to be true. “The sectional is so comfy, and a nice visual reprieve from the typical L-shaped sofa,” she shares.

Still, there's another piece of living room furniture that she can't help but deem as her favorite. “Truth be told, my heart lies with the leather and iron armchair. The lines are just so cool.

Advertisement

Advertisement

When choosing a color palette, Giese relied on the home's surroundings to guide the way. “The overall color palette was inspired by the incredible views on the property. The lot is wooded and private, so it felt it needed to be a calm palette that was more about texture than color,” she explains.

In order to make the home flow effortlessly from room to room, Giese called on her foolproof design elements. “We repeated colors stone, taupe, ivory, and incorporated some of my favorite textures: camel-colored leather, washed or ebonized wood, iron, and jute,” she shares.

The massive marble table from Restoration Hardware may be new to the homeowners, but they've already put it to good use: “We were on a tight deadline to get the table in before our clients were entertaining for the holidays.

We made it by the skin of our teeth!” Since the dining room has several windows and doorways to work around for furniture placement, Giese had to make a statement with as few pieces as possible, making the luxe table a perfect find.

Advertisement

One area that Giese decided not to give the same white wall treatment as the rest of the first floor was the powder room off the kitchen; she opted for a moodier shade, instead.

“The wallpaper was begging to be used in this powder room! It's a fantastic, fern pattern that calls to mind the flora on this property.

The high contrast colorway was perfect to make a statement in the small space,” she says.

Source: https://www.marthastewart.com/7794320/river-road-home-tour-alison-giese-interiors

Consider This Your Foolproof Guide to Choosing the Right Marble Countertop (MyDomaine)

Your Foolproof Guide to Choosing the Right Marble Countertop

Marble surfaces are everywhere lately and it's not hard to see why. This choice is a classic that never seems to go style and it makes any room look expensive, instantly. But any big decision, you should weigh the pros and the cons before you run the plastic.

When it comes to picking a stone to finish off any space you want to know what you’re investing in and whether it’s a true fit for your lifestyle.

You also want to get cozy with the idea of the many different types (and price ranges) marble comes in. Well, consider this your official (and foolproof) guide to choosing the right marble countertop for you.

Read on and soon you’ll be well-versed and ready to pull the trigger.

Is it just us or is marble the ultimate “adult” addition to your home? Not just because it adds a polished sophisticated feel, but because you will never set another glass down without a coaster again, slice a lemon without a cutting board, and you better hope no one gets clumsy with the red wine.

The first question you need to ask when looking for the right marble surface for you is how porous the stone is. Different marbles have different attributes and choosing one that’s less porous can save you a lot of money, and anxieties, in the long run.

Opting for a marble such as Carrara, which is less porous, could have the longevity you’re seeking. Marble is a material made by Mother Earth herself (minerals fused by heat over time, building into the strong rock face we know and love).

Naturally, it comes with its own quirks and characteristics and no two slabs will ever look the same. Calacatta tends to be more white (and pricier) while Carrara can contain more grays and blues in its veining.

When it comes to the veins—one of marbles most charming traits—having a professional who knows how to cut and place each slab, then work those quirks to your advantage may be as close as you will get to perfection.

So how do you cut to ensure you get the look you want? There are two types of cuts: Crosscut and vein cut. The former allows for the veins to be displayed more at random in an open-flower- pattern while the latter has a linear appearance.

When it comes time to lay your stone, make sure you communicate thoroughly with your contractor about how you want the seams (where two pieces of the stone meet) and veins to match up.

Caring for Your MarbleOnce you’ve done your research, picked your marble, confirmed a cut, you should get familiar with what the upkeep might look . Acidic or oily substances citrus, vinegar or cleaning products can leave markings on your marble called etching.

This can dull the surface of your countertops and can be difficult to get out without professional assistance. To avoid this you will want to use a sealant from the get-go and should be aware that over the years you may have to reapply to keep up its attractiveness.

Okay, so maybe your marble countertops coincide with one of the busiest rooms in your abode — not all hope is lost. The finish you choose can play a big part in the upkeep.

While a polished finish may be more ly to show wear and etching, a duller finish will take the years a lot more gracefully.

Same can be said for the way the corners are finished: narrow-cut corners may be more ly to chip than a rounded-off one.

You Don't Have to Go International to Find Good MarbleWhile Italy, Greece, and Spain have long been a go-to source for high-end marble, getting a little more local can still generate quality at a friendlier price. Quarries in Vermont and Colorado are not to be overlooked.

Hailing from Carrara, Italy, this is possibly the most popular pick when it comes to putting the finishing touches on your home. Not only because it’s cost effective and will stand the test of time (and dinner parties) but due to its beautiful attributes.

A stark white stone with blue and grey veins that can really hold its own amongst an all-white kitchen. Also quarried in Carrara, Italy, Calacatta is known for being on the pricier end.

It brings a distinct look—most commonly white with thick dark veining but can also be found in Calacatta Gold (a golden yellow undertone to the vein) and Calacatta Michelangelo (which can be identified with its abundance of natural grey details).

This marble contains a lot of similarities to Carrara in color, however, it's often identified by its natural glossy appearance. An elegant choice.

Also known as Titanium Black Marble, this Greek stone is a contrast to the many milky options we see so frequently. Its smoky white veins make it a stand-out choice.

Also an eye-catching black marble, Marquina is often sought out for being one of the world's most luxurious stones and is infamous for its striking pure white details.

Emperador can be found in Spain and is desirable for its unique rich brown coloring. If you are looking to make a statement yet remain in the realms of earth tones, it could be the marble for you.

Crema referring to it’s creamy-hue (sometimes even leaning towards a blush tone), this is another memorable option for those who don’t want to go crisp white with their surfaces.

It is also a great fit if you’re wary about the surface showing wear—the tan undertones tend to mask subtle staining better than others.

YuleYule marble can only be extracted from Yule Creek, Colorado and has all the charm of a classic white stone. Being that it is more local, the cost of installation can come down significantly.

DanbyDanby marble is another option local to the USA—Vermont to be exact. With its low absorption and multitude of details, it’s a top choice for those seeking that effortless, elevated finish to a room.

Up Next: 11 Online Furniture Stores MyDomaine Editors Always Shop (and Their Top Picks)

Source: https://www.bloglovin.com/blogs/mydomaine-13997320/consider-this-your-foolproof-guide-to-choosing-6791864505

Solved! Figuring Out the Correct Countertop Height for Your Renovation

Your Foolproof Guide to Choosing the Right Marble Countertop

Photo: istockphoto.com

Q: I’m putting in a new kitchen. What’s the right height for the countertops?

A: Well, depends if you want the short answer or the long one. There is an industry standard countertop height recommended by professional installers that can be comfortably reached by people of average height from a standing position without bending over.

While this suits most folks for food prep, you might need to adjust the height of your countertops if they’ll be used for unique purposes or by people with special needs. Once you’ve settled on a height, select cabinets, countertop materials, and appliances that accommodate it.

Read on to learn the correct countertop height for your household, as well as must-know installation info, so your new kitchen will function beautifully for everyone.

The average countertop height is 36 inches above the floor.

The distance from the floor to the countertop work surface should measure 36 inches, according to the American National Standards Institute and Kitchen Manufacturers of America.

This countertop height factors in a base cabinet height of 34½ inches plus a 1½-inch-thick countertop.

That 36-inch height is also suitable if you’ll be mounting countertops directly to a wall with braces and no cabinets below.

Photo: istockphoto.com

Increase the height to 42 inches above the floor for a bar-height countertop.

Bar-height countertops, also known as pub tables, should be positioned 42 inches off the ground (making the base cabinet height 40½ inches off the ground).

This height lets you comfortably place beverages on the bar from either a standing or a seated position.

The 42-inch height factors in the 29- to 32-inch height of standard bar stools plus a clearance of 10 to 13 inches from the top of the stool seat to the countertop.

Decrease the countertop height to between 28 to 34 inches above the floor to accommodate those with limited mobility.

Standards set by the Americans with Disabilities Act state that a countertop height range from 28 to 34 inches will allow individuals who use a wheelchair to easily pull up to the work surface. Base cabinet height would need to be adjusted to between 26½ to 30½ inches above the floor accordingly.

Select countertop material thickness accordingly.

Keep in mind that not all countertop materials are sold in the 1½-inch thickness assumed in the 36-inch standard countertop height.

For example, 1½-inch-thick butcher block countertops are readily available on the market, but granite, marble, and quartz slabs are most commonly sold in a two- or three-cm thickness (roughly ¾-inch-thick and 1¼-inch-thick, respectively).

To increase the overall countertop thickness to 1½-inches when using thinner stone slabs, your countertop installer will lay a foundation of wood “buildup” strips on top of the base cabinets and then install the slab on top.

The thickness of the buildup strips and countertop material should together add up to 1½ inches. For example, a ¾-inch-thick quartz slab can be laid over ¾-inch-thick buildup strips to achieve the desired thickness.

RELATED: Don’t Make These 6 Common Mistakes in Your Kitchen Renovation

Choose appropriately sized cabinets and toe kicks.

Most pre-built base cabinets already conform to the 34-inch-tall height standard, which factors in a cabinet height of 31 inches and a “toe kick” area (between the cabinet and the floor) of 3½ inches.

If you’re building your own base cabinets to conform to the 34-inch height standard, ensure that they measure 31 inches tall, then allocate a clearance of 3½ inches from the floor to the bottom of the cabinet.

Avoid increasing the height of the toe kick, as this will diminish the height of the cabinets and leave you with less storage space.

Photo: istockphoto.com

Ensure countertops are deep enough to protect your base cabinets.

The standard depth of base cabinets is 24 inches, but the depth of your countertops should be 25 inches when installed. The one-inch overhang is recommended to protect your base cabinets from debris and spills that may fall from the countertop.

Pick appropriately sized appliances.

When shopping for a built-in dishwasher, rule out models with a cut-out height (the height of the opening in the cabinet where the dishwasher will go) that’s higher than the height of your base cabinets.

For electric and gas ranges, opt for models that are the same height as your countertop so that the top of the stovetop sits level with the countertops on either side of the range (e.g.

, a 36-inch-tall range for a 36-inch standard countertop height).

RELATED: 7 Smart Tips for Saving Big Money on Major Appliances

Install cabinets and countertops correctly.

If DIY-ing cabinet and countertop installation (which is not recommended for heavy materials granite or quartz), measure the desired base cabinet height from the floor, mark the height on the wall, and install the cabinets so that the tops of the cabinets line up with the mark. Next, attach the buildup strips with screws to the top of the base cabinets if necessary. Then, depending on the material, attach the countertop to the buildup strips with construction adhesive or screws. Your countertops should now stand at the perfect height!

Source: https://www.bobvila.com/articles/standard-countertop-height/

Here’s Everything You Need to Know About Marble Countertops

Your Foolproof Guide to Choosing the Right Marble Countertop

When it comes to selecting kitchen countertops, classic white marble remains the top choice for many homeowners. It’s no surprise that marble countertops are so popular—the material has been attracting fans for millennia.

“It’s a natural material with great variety, depending on which species you select and how it’s cut,” says AD100 architect S. Russell Groves.

“It creates a really lovely natural pattern, which you don’t get with a lot of artificial materials.”

“You won’t find anything as white in nature as white marble,” adds Evan Nussbaum, a vice president at Stone Source in New York. “You just don’t get that color and kind of figuring in any other type of natural stone.”

But it’s not a perfect product. While good-quality marbles, such as the world-famous products from Carrara, Italy, are dense and relatively nonporous—which makes them durable and stain-resistant—they also have weaknesses.

A nonfoliated metamorphic rock, marble is generally composed of calcium carbonate (the same ingredient used in antacids such as Tums) or magnesium carbonate, which react to acids. An acidic kitchen liquid lemon juice or vinegar will etch marble, leaving a dull, whitish mark where it has slightly eaten away the surface, even after the marble has been sealed.

But as long as you choose carefully, know what to expect, and care for white marble countertops, they can be a beautiful, functional choice for your kitchen design that lasts a lifetime.

Types of Marble

Although many people automatically think of creamy, white stone when they think of marble, “there are hundreds of varieties,” says Jason Cherrington, founder and managing director of the U.K.-based stone company Lapicida, including types that are taupe, green, gold, red, and black.

For marble kitchen countertops, however, Nussbaum generally recommends sticking with white. Because acid etching leaves a whitish mark, it is much more noticeable on colored marble than on white marble.

“We put a thousand caveats on any dark marble or nonwhite marble being used for kitchen countertops,” he says, “but it’s a personal choice.”

While classic Italian white marbles Calacatta and Statuario are generally excellent quality and a great kitchen idea, Nussbaum points out that equally high-quality marbles are available closer to home, including Vermont Danby and Colorado Yule.

How to Select Marble Slabs

Every stone slab is slightly different, so it’s ideal to select the exact pieces of stone that will be used for your countertops. “There’s an art to marble—selecting the slabs and understanding where the veining is going to be located on the countertop,” says Groves. “You want to artfully place the markings so that it’s almost a painting.”

At the same time, it’s important to consider how different pieces come together. “The longer the piece you can get without any seams, the better,” says Groves. “If you do have seams, it’s always nice to book-match the marble,” so adjacent pieces have a mirrored appearance.

A piece of Montclair Danby cross-cut marble.Photo courtesy of Stone Source

Veining in Marble

Every quarry is different, but it’s possible to cut certain types of marble blocks two different ways to achieve unique veining patterns. Cross cut, or fleuri cut, results in stone slabs with “an open flowered pattern,” says Nussbaum, which looks fairly random and is ideal for book-matching. Vein cut, or striato, slices the block the other way to achieve a linear, striped appearance.

Source: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/marble-countertops