Vegan Pie Crust Recipes You Need to Try

Easy Vegan Pie Crust

Vegan Pie Crust Recipes You Need to Try

Pie crust is possibly one of the worlds most difficult things to make. That and oxygen. That seems super complicated, but luckily plants have oxygen covered. Thanks plants! Now I will eat you… muhahah.

Ehem, getting back to pie crust: every now and then over the last few years I have tried to make a simple vegan pie crust recipe.

I tested other people recipes, I tried experimenting with techniques and ingredient ratios, and every time I failed miserably. It would fall apart, look terrible, and become wooden when cooked.

Not at all the pie crust of my dreams… or even my nightmares, just completely un-rememberable

Then genius struck! By genius I mean my Nana. My mom has used my Nana’s pie crust recipe since… well since I remember existing.

I asked my mom to send me the recipe, and it turns out it’s basically vegan except for the milk which is a super easy sub.

I gave it a go, and hot dang, it worked perfectly! It was quick, all the tips and techniques were there, and it was easy as pie! (Yeah I nailed that pun, you know it.)

I guess you could consider this recipe a family secret. Hopefully, Nana will be smiling down on me and cool with me sharing this slightly adapted version and praising her awesomeness. Yes? My spidey senses say yes.

That’s how much I love you guys! I am sharing family secrets with you, because you’re my family. Aww shucks, group world hug.

So why does this recipe work perfectly where my other attempts failed? 3 reasons, the correct ratios of ingredients, and two super secret tips that I swear made all of the difference. 1 tip from my Nana, and 1 tip from my Grandma. Now that’s collaboration!

This recipe turns out the perfect pie crust, easily and quickly. It’s flaky and delicious without much effort. This recipe makes one pie crust, but if you want two pie crusts, feel free to double or triple the recipe as needed.

NEW VIDEO: I made a video for my Easy Vegan Pumpkin Pie, and you can watch me make this pie crust followed by the pumpkin pie, and topped with Vegan Coconut Whipped Cream.

For step by step photos follow along below ↓

Nana’s Secret Tip: Chill your tools! Put your bowl, fork or pastry cutter, rolling pin and anything else you might be using in the fridge or freezer (if they are freezer safe) to chill. Cold tools means the vegetable shortening won’t melt and the pastry won’t get too soft.

When you are ready to make your pasty, whisk together the flour, salt, and sugar. Cut the vegetable shortening into cubes and sprinkle over the flour. Use a fork or a pastry cutter to slice the shorting into the flour.

Keep on forking the pastry until you reach a crumbly consistency this. Now drizzle the non-dairy milk over top, and use the fork to continue to mix the dough.

When the non-dairy milk is mixed in and everything comes together this, you are good to go. Don’t over mix.

Grandma’s Secret Tip: Spread a clean tea towel over your work surface. Lightly sprinkle the tea towel with flour. You are going to roll your dough out on top of the floured tea towel. I promise it won’t stick as long as you flour it. This just makes it much easier to pick up the pastry and get it in the pie dish in one piece.

Roughly gather your dough into a ball and put it in the center of the floured towel.

Roll your pastry out. You may wonder why there is a bottle in this picture, you see, I don’t have a rolling pin, never have! So I always just use a glass bottle… and since I am wine drinker, I tend to have those lying around. If you have a real rolling pin, perfect! If not feel free to wash a round bottle and remove any labels and use that instead, they work just as well.

Lightly flour the rolling pin and roll out the pastry. If the dough starts sticking sprinkle some more flour across the surface of the dough.

Roll your dough into a rough circle that is several inches larger than than your pie plate to allow for room for the sides and edges of the crust.

Use the tea towel to help you flip the dough into you pie pan. It’s ok if pieces fall off. Use a knife to cut around the edges and cut off any excess pie crust. If there are any holes, use some of the extra dough to fill them in. Pinch the sides to make a decorative crust. Voila! Nana’s pie crust.

Tools I’m Drooling Over Right Now:

  • 1 1/2 cup all-purpose flour (plus more for rolling)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/4 pound vegetable shortening (1/2 cup + 1 tablespoon) *see notes
  • 1/4 cup non-dairy milk (or more if needed)
  1. To make the dough: Add the flour, salt and sugar into a large bowl and whisk to combine. Cut the vegetable shortening into cubes and scatter into the flour.

    Use a fork or pastry cutter to slice the vegetable shortening into the flour until you reach a crumbly texture. Drizzle the milk across the flour mixture and use the fork to combine.

    Mix until everything comes together and you will be able to form a ball of dough. Don't over mix.

  2. To roll the dough: Spread a clean tea towel over your work surface and lightly sprinkle flour over it. Scoop the dough into a rough ball, and put it in the center of the floured tea towel. Roll it out until you have a rough circle that is several inches bigger than your pie dis, to allow room for the sides and edges of the crust.

  3. To form the pie crust: Use the tea towel to help you flip the dough into the pie dish. If some pieces fall of that's fine. Use a knife to cut off the excess pastry around the edges. If there are any holes, fill them with some of the extra pieces. Pinch the edges to form a pretty crust.

  4. To Pre-Cook Your Pie Crust (optional): Only do this if the recipe requires a fully cooked crust prior to filling it. Preheat your oven to 450F (230C). Pierce the crust all over with a fork. Bake the crust for 15 minutes. Reduce the heat to 400F and continue cooking until the crust is lightly browned, just a couple more minutes.

*This recipe works best with cold tools, so put all of your tools. your bowl, fork or pastry cutter, and rolling pin in the fridge to chill.

*I prefer to use a non-hydrogenated vegetable shortening, just because it's a little less bad for you, but let's be real folks, it's pie crust, it's not health food.

*I found that different shortenings can be a little softer or firmer making the dough hold together a little differently. If the dough isn't quite coming together, try adding 1 tablespoon at a time more non-dairy milk until the dough just comes together.

*Use this recipe to make my Easy Vegan Pumpkin Pie!

Bon Appetegan!

Sam.

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Source: https://itdoesnttastelikechicken.com/easy-vegan-pie-crust/

How do you make vegan pie crust in the food processor?

It couldn’t be easier! First off, you must measure 1/4 cup (or 4 tablespoons) of vegan butter and vegetable shortening. Refrigerate it ahead of time, at least 30 minutes, so that it is very cold when you’re ready to begin. The cold fat is very important to achieving a tender, flaky pie crust, so don’t skip this part!

  1. First, add the flour, sugar and salt to the food processor. Pulse a few times to combine.
  2. Add the cold cubed vegan butter and pieces of vegetable shortening.
  3. Process about 10 seconds, until it looks a coarse meal.
  4. While the processor is running, add a few tablespoons of ice water, until it begins to clump together.

On a lightly floured surface, work the dough into a ball, but don’t use your hands too long or it will warm up the fat, which you don’t want.

Roll it out to about 12 inches in diameter.

Transfer the dough to pie plate. I do this by wrapping the dough around my rolling pin, and then quickly and carefully transferring it.

Don’t worry if it’s not perfect! Mine usually looks something the photo below, kind of a mess. Simply push it into the pie plate, gently. Trim off any excess, and replace any broken areas.

Flute the edges or make another special edge. This tutorial is so helpful!

My Best Tips for a delicious vegan pie crust:

  • Make sure everything is very cold when you start. You can even put the pieces of the food processor that will touch the dough in the fridge for awhile before you begin. The cold fat is essential to a delicious pie crust!
  • Use a combination of vegan butter and vegetable shortening – The vegan butter gives a buttery flavor, while the shortening helps the structure of the crust. I recommend Earth Balance brand of vegan butter, it has the best flavor.
  • Don’t use your hands too much at all! Again, you don’t want to warm things up. And don’t over mix.
  • Use just enough ice water to where it comes together, not too much or you will have a mess. When you can squeeze it in your hand it’s done, though it will look a bit crumbly.

That’s it! For a gluten free crust, check out my Gluten Free Pie Crust made with almond flour.

Use this pie crust for Vegan Pumpkin Pie.

  • 1 1/2 cups all purpose flour spooned and leveled
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup (4 tablespoons) vegan butter, earth balance brand preferred, cold and cut into cubes
  • 1/4 cup (4 tablespoons) vegetable shortening, cold and into a few pieces
  • 3-4 tablespoons ice water
  • Make sure your vegan butter and shortening are very cold before starting. If you only have the tub of earth balance vegan butter, measure 4 tablespoons, then refrigerate along with the shortening for at least 30 minutes. 
  • Add flour, sugar and salt to food processor with the “S” blade. Pulse a few times to combine.
  • Add cold vegan butter and shortening. Process for about 10 seconds, until it looks a coarse meal (see photos above for reference). 
  • Now while the food processor is running, drizzle in 3 tablespoons of ice cold water. When it begins to clump together, stop. You may need to add 1 more tablespoon ice water for it to come together. 
  • Dump the dough onto a lightly floured surface and shape it into a ball. Don't use your hands too much or it will warm the dough, which will make your pie crust less flaky and light. 
  • Roll the dough with a rolling pin to about a 12 inch circle, and transfer to a pie plate. I usually wrap it gently around my rolling pin and then carefully transfer it. Don't panic if it's not perfect, you can fix it in the pie plate!
  • Gently push the pie crust all around the dish, trimming off any excess and replacing any spots that need repair. See this tutorial for fluting the edges and making other special pie edges.
  • It's now ready to use immediately, or refrigerate until you are ready to use. Simply double the recipe for 2 pie crusts (top and bottom). 
  • If you don't want to use a food processor, you can make the pie crust by hand. Simply whisk together the dry ingredients in a large bowl, then add the cold butter and shortening. Use a pastry cutter or fork to cut it in, then drizzle in the ice water and stir until the dough comes together. 
  1. Nutrition information is for 1/8th of the crust.

Serving: 1serving Calories: 196kcal Carbohydrates: 18g Protein: 2g Fat: 12g Saturated Fat: 3g Sodium: 121mg Potassium: 25mg Fiber: 1g Sugar: 1g Vitamin A: 282IU Calcium: 4mg Iron: 1mg Mention @nora_cooks_vegan_ or tag #noracooks!

Source: https://www.noracooks.com/vegan-pie-crust/

Easy Vegan Pie Dough

Vegan Pie Crust Recipes You Need to Try

Making the perfect pie dough is all about the technique, but this easy handmade vegan pie dough is straight forward to follow and makes a super flaky crust!

I have a confession to make. I have never once bought pie dough. And that’s 1) thanks to my mom and grandmother and 2) because it’s easy to make homemade pie dough and the results are infinitely superior. In my easy vegan pie dough recipe, my goal is to break it down for you in manageable and easy to follow steps.

When it comes to pie dough it’s more about the technique than the recipe. Overworked dough turns tough and loses it’s flakiness. Underworked dough can be tricky to roll out and work with. But there’s a lot of room between those two extremes for very good to excellent pie crust, all you need is a bit of patience and some guidance.

I’ve tried a lot of different pie dough recipes over the years, variations with alcohol or vinegar, different ratios of flour to fat to water, making dough by hand or with a food processor. But I keep coming back to this classic dough.

 It has a slightly higher ratio of flour to fat, takes advantage of the superior flakiness of shortening, a sprinkling of sugar to help with the browning of the crust, salt to balance the flavors, and just enough water to bring it all together.

For this recipe I take inspiration from J. Kenji López-Alt and his Easy Pie Dough.

But while I appreciate the ease and almost foolproof-ness of his recipe, I find the crust to be a bit more crumbly in its flakiness than I .

And what can I say, I’m a sucker for making it by hand, it’s almost as fast as using a food processor, you have full control over the dough, and the clean up is 1000x easier.

A note about the ingredients:

You’ve probably heard this before about pie dough but it bears repeating. All of your ingredients should be very cold! The vegan butter should come straight from the fridge as should the shortening.

I keep my shortening in the pantry so this means a little forethought the night before.

If I do forget, I’ll measure out the shortening and stick it in the fridge for at least an hour or until I can feel that it’s very cold and solid to the touch.

Some recipes tell you to refrigerate your flour before but I don’t find that to be necessary, unless it’s over 80 ºF in your kitchen room temperature is fine. You do want to have your water ice cold. You can do this by literally making ice water and then pouring out the water only, or grab super cold water straight from your fridge.

For the vegan butter, you will need to use the sticks of butter. The buttery spreads in tubs have too high of a water content to work well in pie dough.

But whether you want to use Earth Balance (or similar brand if not in the US) or a luxury vegan butter Miyoko’s is up to you.

Note that vegan butter made with coconut oil ( Miyoko’s) will melt at a lower temperature, so just be a bit quicker and more careful when working with it.

Also, for vegan pie dough, using a recipe with 100% [vegan] butter does not work as well. So even though you’ll see non vegan recipes encouraging you to make an all butter crust, I don’t recommend the same with the vegan stuff.

You can make the recipe using half vegan butter and half shortening, or increase the vegan butter by 2oz for a 60% vegan butter and 40% vegetable shortening ratio. However, the higher the fat content in the dough, the trickier it is to work with. I find you can get good flakiness with less vegan butter so have updated my recipe to reflect that!

Step by step instructions:

First, whisk together the dry ingredients to combine them. Take about 1 1/2 cups of the all purpose flour, leaving 1 cup behind to add later. This method helps ensure that you don’t overwork the dough when cutting the fat into the flour. To the 1 1/2 cups of flour add the sugar and salt and whisk to combine.

Pre-cut your fat into chunks, I’ll do about 1/2″ cubes of vegan butter and scoop up a generous teaspoon of shortening. Add this proportioned butter and shortening to the flour and gently stir to coat it in flour.

Next using a handheld pastry blender work the dough, cutting the fat into the flour until you get a pebbly mixture that’s even starting to clump together a bit.

Then add the rest of the flour and briefly cut it into the dough.

If you don’t have a pastry blender, I recommend picking one up, they’re cheap and useful! But if you don’t want to do that you can use two butter knives and cut across the dough in opposition to create the same effect. It is, of course, more work. I’ve done it though when traveling and when in less well-appointed kitchens.

Next add the ice cold water. I to start with just 4 tablespoons (2 oz or 1/4 cup) of water. Sprinkle it over the dough and use a wooden spoon or silicon spatula to start to gently work the water into the dough. You’re ly to still have dry dough, and so if that’s the case add the additional water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until it comes together.

Fold the dough with the spatula or spoon until it mostly comes together.

Some unincorporated clumps of dough are fine, but if you still have dusty dry flour mixture then sprinkle a little more water (1 tbsp or less at at time), until no flour is left.

At this point drop the spatula and briefly go in with your hands to combine the dough into a ball–some unincorporated crumbles are still ok at this point! They just shouldn’t be dry.

Cut the ball of dough into two equal portions and wrap each half in plastic wrap. At this point work any unincorporated dough into the rest of the dough and shape the halves into disks, about 1″ thick.

Put the dough in the fridge where it needs to rest for at least 2 hours.

This resting time ensures that the gluten in the dough has a chance to relax so the dough can be rolled out when cold and maintain its flakey layers.

At this point the dough can be made a few days in advance, and extra dough can be kept in a freezer safe bag in the freezer for longer storage. Defrost the dough in the fridge before using.

Tips on using the dough:

You can use this dough for either two single crusted pies, or one double crusted pie. Roll it out on parchment paper with a light dusting of flour so that it does not stick. Flour the top of the dough and the rolling pin as needed. For a round crust, roll consistently from the center of the dough away from you, turning the dough with each roll.

By rotating the dough with each roll and turning it you ensure an evenly rolled out dough as well as one that doesn’t stick to the counter (or parchment paper) when it comes times to move it. If the dough does start to stick during the rolling process, just sprinkle on a bit more flour where it’s needed.

To transfer the dough to a pan, fold it in half, then half again to make a triangle. Pick it up and place the center of the triangle in the center of the pie dish, then unfold the dough and gently ease it into the edges of the pan.

Be careful not to pull and stretch at the dough. Trim off excess dough leaving about 1/2″ around the edge.

Fold the dough under and if making a single crust pie, crimp or flute the edges of the dough to make a pretty border or use a fork to press it against the edges of the pan.

Otherwise, roll out a second piece of dough and you can cut it into a lattice or place the entire piece of dough on top and poke holes in it with a fork or cut slits with a knife for ventilation. Trim the edges of the dough and make a decorative border (or just crimp with a fork to seal).

In situations you want the pie to hold a decorative shape or if the dough has warmed up over the course of shaping it (which it tends to do), I recommend chilling the pie before baking. This is true for blind baking a pie as well, just chill before filling. You want to cover the pie and refrigerate until the dough is firm to the touch.

If you’re pie dough does lose some of it’s shape while it bakes, don’t stress it, it’s natural for that to happen and it doesn’t mean you won’t have a beautifully flaky pie crust at the end! In full honesty, I tried to rush the entire chilling process of my dough for the lattice pie pictured here to try to get same day photos and ended up with a droopy side as a result. But those flakey layers in the dough were spectacular! It just wasn’t a photo worthy finish.

If you need to blind bake your pie dough, I’m a fan of this blind baking method by Stella Parks. You can also use pie weights or dried beans or rice though the sugar method is pretty cool and accessible! I used it on the pie I’m sharing later this week

Source: https://www.thecuriouschickpea.com/easy-vegan-pie-dough/

Flaky Vegan Pie Crust » I LOVE VEGAN

Vegan Pie Crust Recipes You Need to Try

This vegan pie crust is flavourful, flaky, and easier to make than you might think. It’s perfect for making sweet and savoury pies. I’ve used it to make pumpkin pie, peach galette, tofu pot pies, and tofu quiche.

Making pie crust, vegan or not, can be a little daunting.

But pie dough is more forgiving than you think! If your pie dough is cracking while you roll it out or it sticks to your counter when you try to transfer it to your pie plate, stay calm! A little patience goes a long way.

Pie crust folklore suggests that the best pie crusts are always difficult to roll out. True or not, it’s a comforting notion if you’re struggling with a crumbling pie dough.

Something that makes pie crust seem challenging is that you’re relying on look and feel throughout the process. How small or large you cut the butter into the flour will change the amount of water you need to add. I’ve included pictures to help you gauge how fine to cut the butter and how much liquid is just right.

In this post, I included my best vegan pie crust tips, pros and cons of different fats, and step-by-step photos to walk you through the process.

  • Digital scale
  • Mixing bowl
  • Pastry blender (or a fork)
  • Fork
  • Plastic wrap
  • Rolling pin
  • Off-set metal spatula
  • Pie plate

Pie dough is made up of both pockets of fat coated in flour and hydrated flour (water + flour). By cutting tiny pieces of fat into the dough and then rolling it out, you create super thin layers of fat and hydrated flour.

While you bake the crust, the fat melts, the dough gets crisp, and those flaky separated layers become obvious.

This is why it’s important to keep everything cold, it keeps the fat in a solid state so it can create those flaky layers when baked.

Best Vegan Pie Crust Tips:

  1. Measure flour and vegan butter by weight. A cheap, digital kitchen scale is one of the best tools your can have in your kitchen. It ensures consistent results just as the recipe developer intended. Why does it matter so much? The density of 1 cup of flour can vary greatly from person to person.

    One person’s 1 cup can weigh as little as 120 grams, while another’s can weigh as much as 180 grams. In a recipe calling for 2 cups of flour, a “dense measurer” could be using 1 whole extra cup of flour to the recipe! If that’s not enough, measuring by weight is faster, easier, and uses fewer dishes.

  2. All ingredients and equipment should be as cold as possible. Place your measured butter and flour (plus extra for rolling), mixing bowl, pastry blender, fork, rolling pin, and spatula, in the freezer before getting started.

    If you have a large marble cutting board that you can roll your dough out on, chill that too!

  3. Add the (ice cold) water, 1 tablespoon at a time, and use as little as possible. Too much moisture = too much steam = a tough pie crust. (Adding too little water will make your pie dough harder to work with and prone to cracking.

    With a little patience your crust will still turn out flaky and tender.)

  4. Tightly wrap and chill your pie dough for at least 2 hours before rolling it out. This chills the dough and hydrates the flour making it easier to work with.

Vegan Butter vs. Vegetable Shortening vs. Coconut Oil

Vegan butter, vegetable shortening, and coconut oil are all solid fats which is exactly what you need for making vegan pie crust. But there are pros and cons to each.

Choose a “vegan butter” that’s solid and hard to spread when cold. I always use Earth Balance for vegan pie crust. Do not use vegan margarine ( Becel Vegan) or any other products that are easy to spread straight from the refrigerator.

  • Flavourful (classic butter taste)
  • Easy to work with, roll out, etc.
  • Not a pure fat. Depending on the brand you use, they’ll have varying moisture levels. (Use Earth Balance for best results.)
  • More expensive than shortening

Vegetable shortening (Affordable and easy to work with)

  • Bland flavour
  • Very easy to work with, roll out, etc.
  • Pure fat – no need to worry about varying moisture levels
  • Less expensive than vegan butter

Coconut oil (Most difficult to work with)

  • Coconut flavour (regular coconut oil) or bland flavour (refined coconut oil)
  • Difficult to work with
    • Requires strict temperature control. Coconut oil quickly moves between a solid and liquid state with minor temperature fluctuations.
    • More time consuming (requires time to chill and warm while working).
  • Pure fat – no need to work about varying moisture levels
  • Price varies depending on brand

How to Make Vegan Pie Crust

Before you get started, chill all ingredients and tools.

1. Mix the flour and salt in a medium mixing bowl.

Left: How the vegan pie dough should look after cutting in the vegan butter. Right: Crumbly vegan pie dough that’s just starting to clump together with enough added water.

2. Cut the chilled vegan butter into the flour using a pastry blender or fork until the fat is in small pieces. The image above (left) shows the ideal texture.

Note: If you don’t cut the butter small enough, you’ll need to add more water to make the dough workable. Too much water = a tougher crust. If the butter is cut too small, the crust won’t be as flaky.

3. Slowly add ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time, while gently mixing with a fork. Keep adding the water and stirring until the vegan pie dough starts to clump together on it’s own. The image above (right) shows how the dough should look, crumbly, but starting to hold together. The dough shouldn’t be wet or sticky.

4. On your countertop, lay out a piece of plastic wrap (I use 2, laid out in a cross shape.) Dump the crumbly vegan pie dough in the center of the plastic wrap. Very tightly wrap the dough into a flat disk so that the dough doesn’t appear crumbly at all. Refrigerate for 2 hours before rolling out.

Tip: After wrapping the dough into a disk, squish it down, applying enough pressure to make the dough expand within the plastic wrap. This will make the dough compact and will help prevent cracked edges when you roll out the dough.

5. After chilling the dough, unwrap it and place it on a liberally floured surface. Start rolling from the center of the dough, out to the edges. Roll out the pie dough in different directions to achieve a roughly circular shape.

Tip: After every few passes with your rolling pin, use your metal spatula to release the dough from your work surface. Add more flour as needed.

Tip: If you’re concerned about the pie dough sticking, roll it out on a floured piece of parchment paper!

6. Roll out the dough until the dough is at least 2 inches larger than your pie plate. Gently lift the pie dough from your work surface using your metal spatula, and transfer it to your pie plate.

Tip: You can roll the dough onto your rolling pin to help transfer the dough to your pie plate.

Tip: If you have a ton of excess pie dough, you can cut away some of the excess to make it easier to transfer to your pie plate.

7. Making sure the dough lays flush with your pie plate, all the way into the corners. Leave 1 inch (2.5 cm) of excess for folding and fluting the edges, and cut away the rest.

8. Use your fingers to gently mend any cracks by lightly pinching and massaging them to smooth them out.

9. Slowly and gently fold the excess dough under itself to make a smooth, clean edge, folded on the lip of your pie plate.

10. Use the thumb and index finger of your dominant hand and the thumb of your non-dominant hand to pinch/flute the edge of your pie crust. Use a fork to pierce holes in the bottom of the crust.

Tip: For an easier alternative to fluting the edges, use a fork to press into the edges for a decorative effect.

11. Chill or freeze your pie crust until ready to use.

In most cases you do not need to pre-bake or “blind bake” your crust. Only pre-bake the crust if the recipe calls for it.

Print

This vegan pie crust is flavourful, flaky, and made with vegan butter. It’s perfect for making sweet and savoury pies.

Scale

  • 2 cups (240 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 tsp (1.25 ml) salt
  • 3/4 cup (170 grams) vegan butter (Earth Balance Buttery Spread)
  • 4–8 tbsp (60–120 ml) ice water

Before you get started, chill all ingredients and tools.

  1. Mix the flour and salt in a medium mixing bowl.
  2. Cut the chilled vegan butter into the flour using a pastry blender or fork until the fat is in small pieces.
  3. Slowly add ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time, while gently mixing with a fork. Keep adding the water and stirring until the vegan pie dough starts to clump together on it’s own. The dough should look crumbly, but hold together. The dough shouldn’t be wet or sticky.
  4. On your countertop, lay out a piece of plastic wrap (I use 2, laid out in a cross shape.) Dump the crumbly vegan pie dough in the center of the plastic wrap. Very tightly wrap the dough into a flat disk so that the dough doesn’t appear crumbly at all. Refrigerate for 2 hours before rolling out.
  5. After chilling the dough, unwrap it and place it on a liberally floured surface. Start rolling from the center of the dough, out to the edges. Roll out the pie dough in different directions to achieve a roughly circular shape.
  6. Roll out the dough until the dough is at least 2 inches larger than your pie plate. Gently lift the pie dough from your work surface using your metal spatula, and transfer it to your pie plate.
  7. Making sure the dough lays flush with your pie plate, all the way into the corners. Leave 1 inch (2.5 cm) of excess for folding and fluting the edges, and cut away the rest.
  8. Use your fingers to gently mend any cracks by lightly pinching and massaging them to smooth them out.
  9. Slowly and gently fold the excess dough under itself to make a smooth, clean edge, folded on the lip of your pie plate.
  10. Use the thumb and index finger of your dominant hand and the thumb of your non-dominant hand to pinch/flute the edge of your pie crust. Use a fork to pierce holes in the bottom of the crust.
  11. Chill or freeze your pie crust until ready to use.

Refer to blog post for additional recipe notes and tips.

Keywords: vegan pie crust, vegan pie dough

Source: https://www.ilovevegan.com/pie-crust/

Vegan Pie Crust with Coconut Oil

Vegan Pie Crust Recipes You Need to Try

Easy step-by-step tutorial for an easy vegan pie crust made with coconut oil instead of butter. 5-ingredients and 10 minutes to the perfect vegan pie crust.

Wanna make a vegan pie? Well you need a good vegan pie crust!

This one is so easy it’s ridiculous. And it uses coconut oil so if you’re living somewhere where it’s hard to get vegan butter then this is even better.

This recipe is so simple that I don’t even need to give you a bunch of tips and tricks to get it right, I’d say it’s pretty much foolproof!

A lot of pie crusts do cutesy little puckered folds at the top, which looks lovely, but sadly I am not up to the task. My clumsy fingers do not do the fine artsy stuff with the baking things. So I just made it straight up along the sides, which I thought looked fine and certainly did the job.

This recipe is just 5 ingredients and about 5-10 minutes and you have a lovely vegan pie crust to use with any pie that you please!

How To Make A Vegan Pie Crust

To make this easy vegan pie crust, throw some flour, salt and sugar into a food processor and pulse to combine.

Then add some coconut oil (solid, not melted) and pulse until the mixture is crumbly you can see in the picture above.

Then add some ice water and process until it forms a dough (above). Remove the dough from the food processor, form it into a ball and transfer to a floured surface. Get out the old rolling pin and get to work rolling it out into a giant circle that is big enough to cover your pie dish. 

Carefully lift it up being careful not to tear the dough and place it over your pie dish, tucking it in along the base. Then you simply trim off any excess dough hanging over the sides with a scissors.

Place your pie crust into the fridge while you make the rest of your pie, whatever that may be!

What size pie dish is this pie crust for? 

The pie dish you can see in our photos is 9-inches round. However, there is always a bit of extra dough that I cut off, so I think this would be enough for a 10-inch pie dish as well. And of course if your pie dish is smaller, then you’re definitely covered. 

I used this pie crust for my super delicious vegan pumpkin pie and it was amazing!

It’s everything a pie crust should be, perfectly crisp and it holds its shape perfectly in baking. 

Need A Baked Pie Crust?

It’s a little more tricky to pre-bake this pie crust because without the filling on top, it can shrink or puff up. So you need to get some pie weights. You will need at least 2 packs of these pie weights. You will also need to chill your pie crust in the fridge for at least 30 minutes.

Then top it with baking paper and add the pie weights. Bake it in the oven at 400°F for around 15 minutes so that the sides are golden brown, and then remove the baking paper and pie weights, prick the bottom of the crust with a fork (to allow steam to escape and stop it from puffing up) and bake for a few more minutes until the bottom is lightly browned as well.

For heaps of great tips for blind baking a pie crust (blind baking just means without a filling), check out this great article from Sally’s Baking Addiction. All the tips apply to this crust recipe just as well as to her recipe. 

Enjoy! xoxo

PrintPrint Recipe Pin Recipe

Easy step-by-step tutorial for an easy vegan pie crust made with coconut oil instead of butter. 5-ingredients and 10 minutes to the perfect vegan pie crust.

  • 1 cup + 2 Tbsp (145g) All Purpose Flour
  • 1/4 cup (55g) Coconut Oil (solid)
  • 1/2 tsp Salt
  • 1 Tbsp Sugar
  • 3–4 Tbsp Ice Water
  1. Place the flour, sugar and salt into the food processor and pulse to combine.
  2. Add the coconut oil (must be solid, not melted) and pulse until the mixture is crumbly.
  3. Add 3 Tbsp ice water and pulse to combine. It should look a dough now and if you break off a piece and roll it in your hands it should easily roll into a ball. If it doesn’t then add the remaining Tbsp of ice water and pulse to combine once again.
  4. Remove the dough from the food processor and transfer to a floured surface.
  5. Roll the dough into a big round ball.
  6. Using a rolling pin roll it out from side to side into a a giant round that can fit over your pie dish.
  7. Carefully lift it up and place it over your pie dish, tucking it in along the sides of the pie dish to fit properly.
  8. Take a scissors and trim off any excess dough.
  9. Place your pie crust into the fridge while you prepare your pie filling.

*Recipe adapted from Food52.

  • Category: How To
  • Method: By Hand
  • Cuisine: Vegan
  • Serving Size: Entire Recipe
  • Calories: 1022
  • Sugar: 12.9g
  • Sodium: 1181mg
  • Fat: 51g
  • Saturated Fat: 41.5g
  • Carbohydrates: 123.1g
  • Fiber: 4.4g
  • Protein: 15g

Keywords: vegan pie crust

Source: https://lovingitvegan.com/vegan-pie-crust-with-coconut-oil/