A Pasadena Home Makes a Case for Colorful Décor

A Victorian Farmhouse with Original Style

A Pasadena Home Makes a Case for Colorful Décor
Have fun with color on the porch, Kelly says. Bring the inside to the outdoors. “It’s a fun place to be a little more whimsical.”

Residents of snowy regions around the world have been California dreaming for a while now.

“Home in Pasadena, home where grass is greener,” goes a 1920s song about the Los Angeles suburb. But even earlier still, back in the 19th century, Pasadena was renowned for its generous sunshine, lofty palms and perennial roses.

And no one might know this better than designer, author, blogger and podcaster, Kelly Wilkniss, owner of her very own piece of Pasadena history.

Bringing new life to the house, Kelly has also started growing a garden in the front yard. “I want the outside of the home to be an introduction to what awaits inside.”

This Old House

Kelly and her family reside in a Victorian house built in 1886, the fortunate result of a particularly harsh Midwest winter, she says, recounting excitedly everything she knows about her home.

The house was one of the original dwellings built for the Indiana Colony, a group of Indiana residents who fled to the verdant, rolling hills of Pasadena.

In this case, the grass was actually greener, or at least Pasadena has its beautiful roses.

Found in the entryway, this gorgeous chair is paired with an urn full of reeds to add height.Kelly’s Victorian staircase also features a unique statue that lights up. “In the 19th century, this meant the house was fully paid off,” she reveals.

But it took a while for this Victorian to bloom. First it was moved from the corner near the Rose Bowl to its current location, a move Kelly confirms a prior owner had made.

Later, another owner, the man Kelly purchased the house from, had left the property and back barn full of rubbish. “Oh, you wouldn’t believe what was out there—random things, Trader Joe’s receipts, about 27 phone books and several cars.

” It took Kelly nearly a year and a half to install all the electrical updates and fully renovate the property.

Marigold yellow pillows are paired with the slate gray sofa, as Kelly embraces several hues in her autumn décor. “Most people aren’t drawn to just one thing. It’s all about finding the right balance.”“I didn’t want to commit to wallpapering the whole room, so I slipped some toile wallpaper into these frames.” The tall frames help guide the eye up the corner of the room.

Despite these challenges, though, Kelly knew the house was special. “There was just something about the house,” Kelly says. “It’s not I wanted a Victorian. I just came across it and thought the porch was gorgeous.”

Kelly unearthed these chairs from the property’s barn and had them cleaned up and reupholstered. A garland and papier-mâché cherub adorn the mirror.

Autumn Flowers

The prior owner had painted the inside of the home in garish dark greens and oranges. “Instead, I really wanted a new palette that was neutral.” That way, Kelly says, she could add “pop color” to enliven the house.

“It’s great to bring in natural elements, and nothing does more for a room than bringing in fresh flowers.” A favorite of her “nods to the season,” sunflowers, Kelly says, with their happy golden hues, are a great fall flower.

“When I decorate for the fall, I to be subtle and not go overboard with too much color.”

The formal dining room is fashioned with an antique oak dining set to contrast against the white surroundings.On the opposite side of the dining room sits a settee topped with comfy yellow pillows. The vintage mirrors on the wall are actually a collection of vanity trays.

“I’m not afraid to bring the inside to the outside either,” Kelly explains. She has several pieces of indoor furniture she uses on her porch. “Adding a rug anchored the furniture, and adding draperies delineated the space and gave some privacy,” she says. “Then I added some tall plants to bring height and combine the indoors with the outdoors.”

Staying true to the house’s history, Kelly used brass faucets. “Respecting the age of the house was important throughout the entire process.”The stove is original to the home, but needed to be fixed and thoroughly cleaned before it was safe to use. Above the stove sit odds and ends Kelly has collected over the years, such as an old coffee tin and a set of vintage Sears cookbooks.

A Unique Juxtaposition

Kelly calls her style “farmhouse glam.” “What makes any décor interesting is when you have different looks combined in an interesting way.” Before Kelly’s keen eye for décor reinvigorated the Victorian, the house had been “very dark and full of doilies—Victorian to the extreme,” Kelly laughs. “I certainly didn’t want to live in a museum.”

The bathtub is original to the house, but Kelly updated the space, hanging a trio of light pendants she made from sconces. Each is hung at a different height to create interest and variety.

All the same, Kelly insists she wanted to stay true to the home’s roots.

Many of the house’s characteristic features come from the original: unique light fixtures, an above-ground tub and old wood painted in fresh new shades.

“When Victorians used wood that wasn’t that great, such as in the staircase, they meant for it to be painted,” Kelly says. So she made sure to paint the staircase—but with a style all her own.

Kelly Wilkniss blogs at My Soulful Home, hosts a podcast and sells vintage and vintage-inspired home decor through her shop, Bespoke Decor.

Source: https://www.romantichomes.com/decorate/house-tours/kelly-wilkniss-victorian-farmhouse/

Where Do Interiors Designers Really Shop For Furniture And Decor?

A Pasadena Home Makes a Case for Colorful Décor

You won't believe where some of this is from.

The Design High

If you can’t hire an interior designer, at least you can shop one. And it turns out that’s easier than you think. While the public doesn’t have access to trade-only wholesalers, you might be surprised to learn that many interior designers are finding some of their best items at places where the rest of us shop every day.

I interviewed interior designers from cities including New York, Chicago and Nashville to find out where they source some of their best items from. They gladly spilled, revealing their not-so-secret sauce.  

Big Box Stores

The biggest secret of the Speakeasy at 63 Wall Street is where the furnishings are from.

The Design High

Next time you’re picking up laundry detergent, don’t skip the furniture and decor aisle at Target. So many designers recommend Target for everything from kitchenware to decor and down inserts.

While the store is known for great prices, you’d be surprised to learn that many designers buy items for high-end projects there too. Highlyann Krasnow, founder of The Design High, has decorated luxury buildings in New York City, including 63 Wall Street and 195 Sullivan Street.

She revealed, “For small furniture items and decor, we often source from Target. They have a great selection of small tables, sconces, stools, poufs, room and wall decor.”

Deidre Doherty of Deirdre Doherty Interiors says Ikea can be a great place to shop if you don’t want to overspend. “As much as Ikea has a bad wrap, there are some good staple pieces wall mirrors, bath accessories and you can also upgrade their standard sofas with custom legs for a designer look. This works great for kids areas when you don’t want to break the bank.” 

HomeGoods is another go-to. However, the selection can vary on any given day from store to store. So, if you want first dibs, Kate Marengo of Interior Chicago suggests finding out what days stores gets their deliveries and shop that morning. “The best inventory is snatched up quickly,” she explained.

Perhaps the most unique store a designer suggested was ly the last place on earth anyone would ever think of. Gregory Augustine of Lucas Alexander revealed, “The best decor I’ve gotten from an unexpected source was Petco. It was a metal clip light for a snake tank, which became the perfect picture light when clipped on shelves. No wiring needed, plug and play!” 

So, if you’ve ever thought about using a pet bed as a giant pillow, don’t hesitate.

Department Stores

While most of us know that high-end retailers Bloomingdales and Neiman Marcus have beautiful home departments, designers don’t overlook their less expensive counterparts. Kate Clarke of Homes Reimagined loves to shop Macy’s for bedding. As does Doherty, who suggests their Home Hotel Collection for “fabulous sheeting with lots of thread count and budget options.”

Maggie Natarelli of Raised By Design s Kohl’s especially for mixing high and low.

She told me, “I’m just wrapping up a bedroom for two little girls in Bedford, New York with beautiful hand printed wallpaper by an independent artist in Charleston, South Carolina, but we used bedding from Kohl’s.

They have a huge selection of nice quality cotton bedding and some really cute poppy prints if you are looking for something playful but not alarming.” 

Look Locally 

Tiffany Brooks, who you may know from HGTV’s Smart Home, is a big fan of scouring her local thrift shop. “Thrift stores are my go-to places for one-off items.

An example would be a chair that would be $200-$300. Depending on the condition of the furniture, I would replace the upholstery with a really nice fabric.

Or I'll find a period piece and place it next to something brand new.”

If you unique things or are trying to find items that are not mass produced, Gina Gutierrez, founder and lead designer of Gina Rachelle Design thinks what you are looking for is probably right in front of you.

“Get to know local makers in your area. I going custom or purchasing pieces that tell a story—ethical housewares or an individual's life story.

I have been working with Brian Enright of 12 Sticks since 2013 and he is my go-to for millwork.”

On the Road

Items for sale on display during the monthly flea market held at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena. (Photo… [+] by Paul Mounce/Corbis via Getty Images)

Next time you’re in Nashville or just looking for southern style online, Zoë Cullen of Stay Domio says to check out 1767 Designs. “The owner, Patrick Hayes, and I have collaborated on a couple of really cool projects together.

He always seems to read my mind and knows exactly what I'm looking for.  His art pieces are made from wood rescued from century-old homes in Nashville and each one has so much character.

It's rare that I decorate anything without including something from his shop.”

Art curator and advisor Kipton Cronkite loves the Rose Bowl Flea Market in Pasadena, California. “[It’s] where I find vintage pieces (furniture, art and misc items) from vendors all over California. I'm into 1950s and 1960s decor and these flea markets always have interesting pieces.” 

You can also repurpose items you find when traveling to create something custom that has a deeper meaning to you. For example, Diana Weinstein of Diana Weinstein Designs told me, “I once had a client who brought back sari silks from India which I used to make a custom upholstered bed ”.

Caitlin Rutkay of C.R. Interior Designs s to decorate bedrooms with items she discovers on the road. “Hotels often sell their luxury mattresses, down products, and bedding which give your project a complete luxury feel.”

Shop Online

Lulu and Georgia is a decorator's dream.

Lulu and Georgia

There are endless places to purchase furniture and decor online. But instead of staring at a screen for hours, Cullen highly recommends just shopping at Lulu and Georgia. “It's a curated showroom for everything I'm into right now, and almost always lands in budget.”

Another retailer in that realm is Serena & Lilly, which is Natarelli’s pick. “I recently discovered their collection of original oil paintings, which is beautifully curated— surprising for a major retailer. I’m seeing a lot of big vendors coming out with collections of original art that’s in line with their style.”

Etsy is another great resource, but you have to know where to go. Gutierrez s ModCreation Studio for lighting, art from Urban Epiphany Prints and ceramics from Vitrifried Studio.

It might surprise you to learn that designers are also shopping at many of the same places we go to already—H&M, Zara Home, Amazon, Michaels and even Walmart. Ultimately, you can find anything anywhere as long as you keep your eyes open.

 Doherty has a practical philosophy when it comes to finding decor, “In the era of online shopping designers have to be open to sourcing from unusual places. Just shopping for clothes, you can find nice things anywhere if you pay attention to quality and design.

Nothing is off limits.”

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/amandalauren/2018/06/22/where-interior-designers-shop-for-furniture-and-decor/

The best design and furniture stores in LA

A Pasadena Home Makes a Case for Colorful Décor

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Whether you’re looking to transform your home into a Moroccan paradise or a minimalist retreat, these local stores will help you show off your interior design chops.

While these boutiques may lack a maze- layout (we see you, supersized Ikea) or catalogs of encyclopedic proportions (ahem, Restoration Hardware), their well-curated inventories speak for themselves.

And whether you’re a midcentury modern enthusiast who can’t turn away from a tapered leg, a maximalist design fiend with a thing for gold-and-marble everything, or an eclectic collector of curiosities, there’s something for everyone on this list.

Alongside one-of-a-kind Gold Bugand locally-based chain HD Buttercup, explore the map below for LA’s best independent boutiques and showrooms for all abode styles and budgets.

If we missed your favorite store, let us know on the tip line or in the comments, and we might add it in.

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This 10,000-square-foot warehouse houses pristine midcentury modern seating and lighting straight outta Holland. You can also swing by their New Made LA shop in Highland Park, where you’ll find vintage-inspired modern goods all handmade in our city.

Gypset decor aficionados will find all of the Moroccan imports needed to create the globally-inspired abode of their dreams, including carved wood cabinets, decorative mirrors, brass and glass lamps, colorful leather poufs, handmade mosaic tile tables, and more.

3. Bauer Pottery Showroom

This unique Culver City antiques wonderland is a favorite among set decorators, event planners, and amateur and pro interior designers, and with good reason. There’s something for every taste and room, eclectic industrial tables, decorative crocodile skulls, ornate vintage cabinets, and more.

After elbowing your way through the selfie shoots (just look for the massive Made in LA mural), explore the store’s inventory of sustainable and eco-friendly furnishings, seating, vintage decor, kitchen linens, and more.

Founded by interior designers Mat Sanders and Brandon Quattrone, this boutique is little bit Italian modern and a little bit Miami Vice, but with a globally-inspired bent.

Here, find printed pillows by Shilo Engelbrecht and sleek bedsheets by Parachute alongside brass bar carts, furniture by celebrity interior designer Estee Stanley, and playful handmade ceramics by Lux/Eros, to name just a few.

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Swedish interior designer Isabelle Dahlin's roots inform her globally-inspired home furnishings boutique, which relocated from Silver Lake to Atwater Village earlier this year.

(There's also an outpost in Ojai.

) The shop stocks midcentury modern seating and primitive mixing bowls alongside colorful vintage pillows and industrial lighting, plus custom vintage-inspired furniture.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

11. Grace Home Furnishings

Geared towards purveyors of contemporary decor, this 3,000-square-foot Brentwood Village store “combines East Coast refinement and Old Hollywood glamour with the comfort and ease of Southern California living.”

This is how we imagine the Most Interesting Man in the World’s pad would look. Husband-and-wife owners Scott Jarrell and Kristan Cunningham’s Arts District shop is where you’ll find vintage fur rugs and WWII-era bric-a-brac mixed in with midcentury modern chairs, luxe leather accessories, and musky home fragrances.

Now with four home decor havens across LA, HD Buttercup’s largest (and first) outpost in Culver City’s Helm Bakery District boasts over 100,000 square feet of vintage, antique, and modern furnishings, seating, lighting, decor, rugs, and more. Don’t miss its half-yearly sales and warehouse blowouts for major markdowns, too.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

Playful and smart Scandinavian design is on display at this modern Abbot Kinney boutique, which carries adorable Studio Arhoj ceramics, furniture by Menu, kitchen goods by Stelton, and clothing for women, men, and kids.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

16. Kelly Wearstler Flagship

The California design mastermind has dressed up hotels such as the Viceroy Miami and Four Seasons Anguilla, and at her LA flagship, you’ll find pieces ( chunky gold-accented marble tables and carved oak credenzas) to recreate her maximalist style. Her raw and refined approach extends to luxe tabletop decor and pieces for your jewelry box, too.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

This 12,000-square-foot midcentury modern furniture showroom is filled floor to ceiling with complete dining chair sets, pristine credenzas, coffee tables, lighting, and decor imported from Denmark and Sweden.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

For true-to-the-original (read: not knock-offs) fiberglass shell chairs, Case Study furniture, George Nelson bubble lamps, and other midcentury modern design classics, a visit to Modernica is a must.

26. Tortoise General Store

If MUJI’s massive stores prove overwhelming for your minimalist Japanese-inspired abode, retreat to this small but well-curated Venice shop by way of Tokyo. Find hemp palm scrubbers, coffee and tea brewing essentials, stationery, and tableware by Hasami Porcelain in the mail store, then make your way to the back space for more home goods and works by Japanese artists.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

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This 10,000-square-foot warehouse houses pristine midcentury modern seating and lighting straight outta Holland. You can also swing by their New Made LA shop in Highland Park, where you’ll find vintage-inspired modern goods all handmade in our city.

Gypset decor aficionados will find all of the Moroccan imports needed to create the globally-inspired abode of their dreams, including carved wood cabinets, decorative mirrors, brass and glass lamps, colorful leather poufs, handmade mosaic tile tables, and more.

This unique Culver City antiques wonderland is a favorite among set decorators, event planners, and amateur and pro interior designers, and with good reason. There’s something for every taste and room, eclectic industrial tables, decorative crocodile skulls, ornate vintage cabinets, and more.

After elbowing your way through the selfie shoots (just look for the massive Made in LA mural), explore the store’s inventory of sustainable and eco-friendly furnishings, seating, vintage decor, kitchen linens, and more.

Founded by interior designers Mat Sanders and Brandon Quattrone, this boutique is little bit Italian modern and a little bit Miami Vice, but with a globally-inspired bent.

Here, find printed pillows by Shilo Engelbrecht and sleek bedsheets by Parachute alongside brass bar carts, furniture by celebrity interior designer Estee Stanley, and playful handmade ceramics by Lux/Eros, to name just a few.

Swedish interior designer Isabelle Dahlin's roots inform her globally-inspired home furnishings boutique, which relocated from Silver Lake to Atwater Village earlier this year. (There's also an outpost in Ojai.

) The shop stocks midcentury modern seating and primitive mixing bowls alongside colorful vintage pillows and industrial lighting, plus custom vintage-inspired furniture.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

Geared towards purveyors of contemporary decor, this 3,000-square-foot Brentwood Village store “combines East Coast refinement and Old Hollywood glamour with the comfort and ease of Southern California living.”

This is how we imagine the Most Interesting Man in the World’s pad would look. Husband-and-wife owners Scott Jarrell and Kristan Cunningham’s Arts District shop is where you’ll find vintage fur rugs and WWII-era bric-a-brac mixed in with midcentury modern chairs, luxe leather accessories, and musky home fragrances.

Now with four home decor havens across LA, HD Buttercup’s largest (and first) outpost in Culver City’s Helm Bakery District boasts over 100,000 square feet of vintage, antique, and modern furnishings, seating, lighting, decor, rugs, and more. Don’t miss its half-yearly sales and warehouse blowouts for major markdowns, too.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

Playful and smart Scandinavian design is on display at this modern Abbot Kinney boutique, which carries adorable Studio Arhoj ceramics, furniture by Menu, kitchen goods by Stelton, and clothing for women, men, and kids.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

The California design mastermind has dressed up hotels such as the Viceroy Miami and Four Seasons Anguilla, and at her LA flagship, you’ll find pieces ( chunky gold-accented marble tables and carved oak credenzas) to recreate her maximalist style. Her raw and refined approach extends to luxe tabletop decor and pieces for your jewelry box, too.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

This 12,000-square-foot midcentury modern furniture showroom is filled floor to ceiling with complete dining chair sets, pristine credenzas, coffee tables, lighting, and decor imported from Denmark and Sweden.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

For true-to-the-original (read: not knock-offs) fiberglass shell chairs, Case Study furniture, George Nelson bubble lamps, and other midcentury modern design classics, a visit to Modernica is a must.

If MUJI’s massive stores prove overwhelming for your minimalist Japanese-inspired abode, retreat to this small but well-curated Venice shop by way of Tokyo. Find hemp palm scrubbers, coffee and tea brewing essentials, stationery, and tableware by Hasami Porcelain in the mail store, then make your way to the back space for more home goods and works by Japanese artists.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

Source: https://la.curbed.com/maps/best-furniture-antique-stores-los-angeles